These Pork Pot Stickers Have an Easy Shortcut Ingredient
2024/02/08

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With a flavorful filling and pasta-like wrapper with a crispy, crunchy bottom, you'd be hard-pressed to find a more satisfying food than a good pot sticker. The good news is, this recipe makes them easy! Using store-bought dumpling wrappers and a quick stir-together filling, these simplified pot stickers are achievable in any kitchen. The most time-consuming part is filling and folding, but extra hands make it fun and quick! It's the perfect activity for the family, a fun edible craft with friends, or a unique . Whether you’re frying them up that night or freezing them for a rainy day, these flavorful pot stickers make a filling snack or 

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 dunked into  or nestled in a bowl of !

What is the difference between dumplings and pot stickers?

Simply put, a pot sticker is a type of dumpling. Coined by Buwei Yang Chow in her book (1945), pot stickers are dim sum favorites usually containing pork, cabbage, scallions, ginger, and sesame oil. They are steamed and pan-fried in the same pan, giving them a chewy top and crispy bottom. They get their name because the starchy dumpling wrapper can sometimes stick to the pan; make sure to use a nonstick skillet for these!  

Dumplings usually consist of pieces of cooked dough, often wrapped around fillings. However, American

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do not have a filling; the dumpling is more of a dough that is cooked in a flavorful chicken soup. There are so many examples of dumplings around the world, each with their own unique story and classification. Try as many as you can and find your favorite!

What is pot sticker sauce made of?

There are many different ways to make a pot sticker sauce and they are all delicious. Whether you want lots of chili oil, a smattering of minced garlic, or a drop of sesame oil, this sauce can be customized! This recipe creates a simple sauce that with a sour-salty-sweet flavor profile from a combination of soy sauce, rice vinegar, chopped green onion, and a touch of sweet hoisin sauce. 

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1/2

head green cabbage, cored and finely shredded

1/2 tsp.

kosher salt

6

green onions, finely sliced and divided

4

cloves garlic, grated

1/4 c.

plus 2 tbsp. soy sauce, divided

1 tbsp.

grated fresh ginger or ginger paste

1 tbsp.

plus 1 tsp. hoisin sauce, divided

1 tsp.

sesame oil

1 lb.

ground pork

1

(10- to 12-oz.) package dumpling wrappers (gyoza)

1 tbsp.

vegetable oil, or more as needed

2 tbsp.

rice vinegar

Chili oil, to serve (optional)

Step  1 Place the shredded cabbage into a fine mesh strainer or colander set in a bowl. Toss the cabbage with the salt and let it stand at room temperature for 20 minutes. Using hands, squeeze the excess moisture from the cabbage and place the cabbage in a large bowl. Discard the liquid.

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Step  2 In the bowl with the cabbage, stir together 5 sliced green onions, garlic, 2 tablespoons of soy sauce, ginger, 1 tablespoon of hoisin sauce, and sesame oil. Using a fork, stir in the ground pork. Continue stirring until well-combined; do not over-mix or the filling will be tough. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate the filling until well-chilled, at least 30 minutes. Step  3 Working with one dumpling wrapper at a time, scoop about 1 tablespoon of filling into the center of the wrapper. (Keep the remaining dumpling wrappers covered with plastic wrap to prevent them from drying out.)

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Step  4 For the regular folded dumplings: Moisten the edges of the wrapper with water and fold the dumpling into a half-moon shape, pressing to seal. Transfer the potsticker to a baking sheet, flat-side down, and repeat with the remaining dumpling wrappers and filling. Step  5 For the pleated dumplings: Moisten the edges of the wrapper with water. Hold the dumpling in the palm of your hand like a taco, pinch one bottom corner closed, and begin to pleat one edge of the wrapper, working your way to the other end, pressing the pleated edge into the other side of the wrapper as you go. (If needed, add water to the pleats so they stick.) Transfer the potsticker to a baking sheet, flat-side down, and repeat with the remaining dumpling wrappers and filling.

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Step  6 To a large nonstick skillet, add 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil. Arrange the desired amount of pot stickers, flat-side down, in the pan and turn the heat to medium. Cook, without moving the pot stickers, until they are golden on the bottom, 2 to 3 minutes. Immediately add ⅓ cup water and cover. Let simmer, covered, for 3 minutes (or 5 minutes if the pot stickers are frozen). Uncover the pot stickers and continue cooking until the water evaporates and the potstickers form a deeply golden crust, about 2 minutes more. Remove the pot stickers to a serving plate and repeat the process with more potstickers, if you like.

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Step  7 Meanwhile, in a small bowl, combine the rice vinegar, the remaining ¼ cup soy sauce, remaining 1 sliced green onion, and remaining 1 teaspoon hoisin sauce. Step  8 Serve the pot stickers hot with the dipping sauce and chili oil, if you like. Step  9 Freezing instructions: The uncooked pot stickers can be tightly wrapped with plastic wrap and refrigerated for up to 1 day. They can also be frozen on a sheet tray for 1 hour and transferred to a zip-top bag for up to 1 month. There is no need to thaw the dumplings; add 2 to 4 minutes to the cook time.

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