The Best Substitutes for Molasses When Your Last Jar Is Empty
2024/02/16

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If you've ever wondered what gives their distinct flavor and texture, it just so happens to be a dark, sticky-sweet syrup known as molasses. Avid bakers may have a jar tucked in the back of their pantry for baking , but this syrup can also be added to , drizzled into for subtle sweetness, or used to make a batch of delicious . Some folks even prefer it over maple syrup on a stack of ! Still, there's a good chance you're not reaching for it everyday. So what happens when you get hankering for Ree Drummond's and realize you're fresh out? Don't panic! These easy substitutes for molasses will save the day.

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A byproduct of the sugar-making process, molasses comes in different varieties, from light and mild to dark and intense. First, sugarcane or sugar beets are crushed and the liquid is extracted, then the liquid is cooked down and the sugar crystals are removed. What's left is the mildest, sweetest, and most common version of molasses you'll find. It's referred to as light molasses. When the byproduct is boiled down even more, it becomes darker, thicker, and slightly less sweet; this is dark molasses. After the third boiling, blackstrap molasses is produced: This kind of molasses is very thick, dark, and bitter.

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Molasses is also found both sulfured and unsulfured. Sulfured molasses is made from young sugarcane and is treated with sulfur dioxide for the purpose of preservation; it is usually slightly less sweet. You're more likely to find unsulfured molasses at the grocery store: it's made from mature sugarcane.

Next time you discover you're out of molasses, don't make a mad dash to the supermarket. Try one of these simple substitutes instead.

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